How To Make Daing Na Tilapia?

Filipinos love dried fish, often known as “tuyo” or “daing na isda,” which is one of their favorite foods. Fry or smoke dried fish to prepare it, and certain meal preparations also employ it as a condiment.

1. Split fresh fish into butterfly fillets after properly cleaning it (for smaller fish, splitting is not necessary)

2. To remove the blood, soak the fish in 10% brine for 30 minutes. 3 to 6 hours of soaking in 33% brine

3. Remove the fish from the water and place them on drying trays.

4. Dry the fish in the sun or at 65–70°C in an artificial dryer.

5. Place in polyethylene bags after cooling.

What is tilapia from Daing?

Fish is split open, gutted, marinated, and sun dried before being fried in the dish known as Daing na Isda. Making food with staples found in the pantry is so simple and uncomplicated. Filipinos love eating this delectable Daing Isda for breakfast. I can eat this whenever I want with either garlic rice or regular steamed rice.

Making Daing na Isda is quite simple, and you can use a variety of fish, including bangus, hasa hasa, galunggong, and bisugo. Use a sharp knife to butterfly-split the fish, then thoroughly rinse and pat it dry before marinating. The fish is fermented and cured by Daing na Isda using a marinade of vinegar, salt, and pepper. If necessary, add extra salt and freshly ground pepper.

I used galunggong fish for this Daing na Isda, and it turned out really well. In Texas, the sun was out yesterday, so I made the most of it.

I gave the butterflied galunggong fish a two-hour marinade before sun-drying it for four. It was delicious when served with garlic fried rice and scrambled eggs. Watch the video below for a step-by-step visual tutorial.

Try this dish and tell your family and friends about it. Prepare a couple pounds of Daing na Isda and store it in the freezer. Ilonggo Laswa or Bulanglang go well together. See related recipes below, then click on a name link to get the full recipe.

  • Large galunggong or hasa hasa, 1 lb.
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1/8 teaspoon of red chili flakes
  • 1/tsp. salt
  • 12 teaspoon sugar
  • vinegar, 3/4 cup
  • frying oil for food
  • Remove the entrails by cutting the fish in half. After washing, dry with a paper towel under running water.
  • Vinegar, black pepper, garlic, chili flakes, salt, and sugar should all be combined in a large bowl. To blend, thoroughly stir. If extra salt or pepper is required, taste the dish.
  • Place the fish in the marinade to soak. Ensure that the marinade covers the entire piece of fish. For at least an hour, cover the basin and chill.
  • Take the fish out of the marinade and let it sun dry for a couple of hours. If you want it to be dryer, let it out longer.
  • Cooking oil is added to a heated pan at medium heat.
  • Fry each side for 5 to 7 minutes, or until crispy and golden.
  • Serve the rice with tomato slices and garlic fried garlic on a serving platter. Enjoy!

What purpose does drying tilapia serve?

Drying is used to reduce the moisture content of fish to a level that can stop the development of mold and microbe infestation, hence minimizing microbial degradation.

What is the recipe for salted dried fish daing?

Dried split fish, sometimes referred to as “daing” (split form), is fish that has been heated with or without salt from a fresh state to a significantly lower moisture level in order to preserve its acceptability over a lengthy period of time.

1. Use clean, fresh water to properly wash the galunggong. 2. Butterfly-fillet the fish, then remove the gills and internal organs. Rewash the fish well. 3. Drain the fish and put it in a strainer. 4. Make the brine mixture (i.e., mixture of water and salt). Use 6.5 kilograms of salt and 5 gallons of water to prepare a 60 kilogram fresh fish. 5. Soak the fish for an hour in a brine solution. Drain the salted fish, please. 7. Thoroughly rinse the fish under running water to remove extra salt. 8. Position or place fish on a wire mesh screen. To ensure that the fish dries uniformly, avoid stacking them on top of one another. 9. To protect the fish from infection as it dries, cover it with the other half of the mesh or wire screen. 10. Dry fish for two to three days in the sun or in direct sunlight. 11. After drying, let the dried fish cool at room temperature for at least 6 hours. 12. Dryed fish should be weighed, packed, sealed, and kept at room temperature.

  • Assumptions:
  • sources for the steps:

Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI) – Department of Science and Technology (DOST)

III. Estimated Costing and Pricing (FOR 1 KILOGRAM OF GALUNGGONG DAING) * The markup can be increased to more than 25% by increasing the amount of production per day (more than 60 kg). This lowers the production cost. The profit margin increases as the markup does.

* Increase markup to 25% or higher if the price per kilogram is less than the going rate in the market.

How is fish dried for daing?

Ingredients for salted dried split fish:

Procedure:

1. Use clean, fresh water to properly wash the galunggong.

2. Butterfly-fillet the fish, then remove the gills and internal organs. Rewash the fish well.

3. Drain the fish and put it in a strainer.

4. Make the brine mixture (i.e., mixture of water and salt). Use 6.5 kilograms of salt and 5 gallons of water to prepare a 60 kilogram fresh fish.

5. Soak the fish for an hour in a brine solution.

Drain the salted fish, please.

7. To properly clean the fish, rinse it under running water.

8. Position or place fish on a wire mesh screen. To ensure that the fish dries uniformly, avoid stacking them on top of one another.

9. To protect the fish from infection as it dries, cover it with the other half of the mesh or wire screen.

10. Dry fish for two to three days in the sun or in direct sunlight.

After drying, let the dried fish cool for at least six hours before eating.

12. Dryed fish should be weighed, packed, sealed, and kept at room temperature.

The tagalog word “tuyo” means “dry.” Fish that can be kept for months in storage is preserved through the processes of salting and drying. During the summer, when there is minimal rain and the producers have plenty of time to dry and preserve the fish, salted fish is traditionally dried for six months.

1. Wash the tunsoy fish thoroughly in fresh, clean water. Drain for 20 minutes by placing in a strainer.

2. make the brine mixture (i.e., mixture of water and salt). Use 6.5 kilograms of salt and 5 gallons of water for a 60 kilogram fresh fish.

3. Soak the fish for three hours in the brine solution.

4. Put the fish in a colander so it can drain.

5. Thoroughly rinse the fish under running water to remove extra salt.

6. Spread the brined fish out over a 6-m. wire screen mesh.

7. To shield the fish from insects and dust, cover it with the other half of the wire screen.

8. Depending on the size of the fish, let it dry in the sun for two to three days. To slow down the rate of drying, it is best to air dry the fish in room temperature after drying it in the sun for three to four hours in the morning.

9. To ensure equal drying, flip the fish over every hour or so. Fish that has been properly dried is light in weight and has soft meat.

10. Weigh, package, seal, and keep the fish chilled.

How is the Daing kept alive?

Fish that has been dried and baked in the sun is called daing, tuyo, or bilad in the Philippines. Although they can be served whole, fish used for daing are often gutted, thoroughly salted, and then sun and air dried. Additionally, there are “boneless” varieties that fillet the fish before drying. As salt prevents bacteria from growing, it was originally used as a preservation method to keep seafood fresh for a long time.

Before eating, daing is grilled or fried, though it can alternatively be cooked in the oven while being wrapped in foil. It is typically eaten for breakfast with white rice and vinegar dipped in it. Notably, champorado is typically served with it (traditional Filipino chocolate rice gruel). Additionally, it can be a component in other recipes.

Daing is seen as a cuisine of poverty because of its relative affordability, yet it has grown in importance in Philippine culture as a comfort food.

What ingredients are necessary to produce dried fish?

Fish must first be sliced open and salted before being dried and salted to make dried fish. Sardines, horse mackerel, flatfish, and sea bream are just a few of the many fish that can be employed. We make use of an Atka mackerel this time. Salt is also required to pickle the fish.

What steps are involved in salting fish?

Fish salting by hand is a widespread traditional processing technique. It is frequently combined with smoking and drying. It is a cheap method of preserving fish. Dry salting, in which salt is sprinkled directly onto the surface of the fish, and brining, in which the fish are submerged in a salt/water solution, are the two most popular salting techniques. Fish from both the sea and the land are salted. Prior to salting, fish are divided, sliced into pieces, or salted whole (if they are little).

The kind of salt used and the length of the process have an impact on the salting process and product properties. Depending on the species and the salt/moisture content, salted fish typically has a shelf life of 6 months.

Intake of salt is impacted by:

  • fat amount
  • Size of the fish
  • Freshness
  • Temperature

Infestation, improper handling, and poor raw material quality all contribute to food loss and waste (FLW).

As an illustration, FLW may develop as a result of an insect infestation (Dermestes spp., Necorbia spp.), an animal pest attack (such as rats), the formation of mold, physical harm, and chemical alterations brought on by oxidized lipids (fats). Pests and insects frequently result in loss of quality and waste. Fat oxidation causes dried goods to change color, which can have an impact on both the value of the product (rancidity) and its flavor. Nutrient loss is also connected to oxidation.

The condition known as “putty fish,” which is brought on by both heat and germs, is another factor that can contribute to FLW. When fish grow too warm, they become brittle and are more likely to break open when dressed or split. Bacteria enter these cracks later during the splitting and cleaning processes. Many of these fissures are sealed when the fish is salted, keeping the bacteria inside and the salt outside. If the germs multiply quickly enough, they could ruin the fish before the salt kills them. Only huge fish typically become puttied since it typically takes one to two full days for the salt to enter the thicker sections of the fish in warm weather.