How Many Calories Are In A Can Of Albacore Tuna?

This nutrient-dense tuna can, which has 110 calories and 26 grams of protein per serving, is suitable for the Mediterranean, Weight Watchers, Keto, and Paleo diets.

White Albacore Tuna in Water, in Chunks (Can)

++Each serving of our 3 oz. can of chunk white albacore tuna in water has 140 mg of EPA and DHA together. The combined EPA and DHA content of our 5 oz. can of chunk white albacore tuna in water is 270 mg per serving. The combined EPA and DHA content of our 12 oz. can of chunk white albacore tuna in water is 220 mg per serving.

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How many calories are there in a can of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Calorie content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water:

How much fat is in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water? Fat content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna: total

How much saturated fat is there in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Saturated fat content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water: Saturated

How much cholesterol is there in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Cholesterol content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water: Cholesterol

What is the salt content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Sodium content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water Sodium

How much potassium is there in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Potassium content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water: Potassium

How many carbohydrates are there in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Carbohydrate content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water: Carbohydrates

How many net carbohydrates are there in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Net carbohydrate content of solid white albacore tuna in water, canned and drained:

How much sugar is there in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Sugar content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water

How much fiber is in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Fiber content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water: Fiber

How much protein is in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Protein content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water

How much calcium is in canned, drained solid white albacore tuna? Calcium content of canned, drained solid white albacore tuna in water: Calcium

Your values may vary because the Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Is canned albacore tuna healthy?

You cannot go wrong with this white meat tuna, whether you choose to eat it in solid larger chunks, like a fillet, or in smaller pieces, like from a can. Complete protein, which aids in tissue growth and repair, the production of enzymes, the contraction of muscles, and use as a reserve energy source, is abundant in albacore tuna. Additionally, it contains significant amounts of selenium, which when mixed with proteins produces compounds that function as antioxidants and control thyroid hormones. Additionally, selenium aids in the control of immunological response. And albacore tuna is a fantastic source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for the heart. The omega-3 fatty acids in albacore tuna may help reduce triglycerides, atherosclerotic plaque progression, stop arrhythmias, and lower your chance of developing heart disease. The 109 calories and 2.5 grams of total fat in a 3-ounce serving of canned albacore tuna packed in water are quite low. These health advantages are numerous!

Albacore tuna does, however, contain more mercury than canned light tuna, thus expectant or parenting women should consume fewer than 6 ounces of albacore tuna each week. You might wish to choose sodium-free tuna to lower your sodium intake because sodium is added during processing.

  • Olive oil, two tablespoons
  • Sliced shiitake mushroom caps, 4 cups
  • 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  • one-fourth cup vegetable broth
  • Quartered lengthwise, two medium young bok choy
  • one teaspoon of sesame oil
  • Sesame seeds, two teaspoons
  • 2 tablespoons of soy sauce with less sodium
  • 2 teaspoons freshly chopped cilantro
  • Canola oil, 1 tablespoon
  • 4 (6 ounce) thawed albacore tuna fillets, fresh or frozen
  • 0.5 teaspoons of salt
  • freshly ground black pepper, one-fourth of a teaspoon
  • Hot, cooked long-grain white rice, two cups

A hot medium skillet should be filled with olive oil. Stir to combine. When the oil is hot, add the mushrooms to the skillet. Stir and cook for 5 minutes, or until the mushrooms are lightly browned. Add vinegar and broth to the skillet; bring to a boil and cook for approximately a minute, or until the liquid nearly completely evaporates. Stay warm. Bok choy is steamed for a minute. A second medium-sized skillet is heated at medium-high. Swirl a little sesame oil into the pan to coat. Cut sides down, add the steamed bok choy, and heat for 1 minute. Sesame seeds and soy sauce should be added to the skillet and cooked thoroughly for about a minute. Mix in 1 tablespoon of the bok choy boiling liquid and the cilantro. Ensure that a sizable cast-iron skillet is hot. Swirl canola oil into the pan to coat it. Add tuna to skillet after evenly seasoning with salt and black pepper. Cook tuna fillets in a pan for 1 minute on each side, or until they are cooked to your preference. Observe for one minute. Slices should be 1/4 inch thick. To serve, distribute the cooked rice among the four serving plates in an even layer. Then, top each meal with two bok choy quarters. On each plate, arrange a sliced tuna fillet and evenly distribute the mushroom mixture on top of each one. 4 SERVES

Is albacore tuna beneficial for losing weight?

Additionally, it lasts a long period. In your pantry, some brands can last for two to five years.

Because it has few calories and a lot of protein, canned tuna is a smart choice if you’re trying to lose weight.

High-protein diets have been linked to advantages for weight loss, including heightened sensations of fullness and less cravings (7, 8).

Tuna is nevertheless regarded as a strong source of omega-3 fatty acids despite having little fat (1, 2, 9).

Omega-3s are necessary dietary fats that are good for the health of the heart, eyes, and brain. Although you can also acquire omega-3s from plant foods, fish is thought to be a key dietary source of these beneficial fats (10, 11).

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans currently advise individuals to eat 8 ounces (227 grams) of seafood weekly as a result (12).

If you want to compare brands, examine the labels because the types and quantities of fats can differ depending on the type of canned tuna you select (1, 2, 12).

In addition to being a rich source of healthful fats, canned tuna is also a wonderful source of a number of vitamins and minerals, particularly selenium and vitamin D. (1, 2).

Last but not least, despite being in a can, many kinds of canned tuna contain merely tuna, water or oil, and salt. For added flavor, certain brands could also include seasonings or broth.

An affordable, low-calorie source of protein and other crucial elements, such as omega-3 fatty acids, is canned tuna. In your pantry, some brands can last for two to five years.

Which is better for you, albacore or tuna?

The only tuna that can be classified as having white meat is albacore. Solid albacore is a term used to describe white tuna in cans where the fish is still in bigger pieces. Chunk white tuna is the name for albacore that has been sliced into smaller pieces and canned.

Compared to solid or chunk light fish, albacore tuna is a larger fish with lighter-colored flesh, a firmer texture, and a milder flavor. There are numerous varieties of tuna, including the bluefin, yellowfin, skipjack, bigeye, bonito, blackfin, and albacore, as we have all heard. Only the albacore tuna of the seven varieties is thought to have the purest white meat.

After yellowfin tuna, albacore is the second most popular commercial catch in the United States. They are the two tunas that are frequently found in sushi bars and seafood restaurants. Albacore is typically prepared as sushi or sashimi at Japanese restaurants. You can locate albacore in the grocery stores if you’re looking for “fancy white” or just plain “white tuna.” It costs more than conventional tuna.

Every ocean, including the Mediterranean Sea, as well as tropical and temperate waters around the world are home to the fish. However, it is typically found in the oceanic regions of the eastern Pacific. Although they eat other fish, they differ from other tuna in that their main food source is mollusks like octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish. At any given cycle, they can lay up to 2 million eggs for reproduction.

They enjoy the same nutritional benefits as other tuna varieties: It is a good source of selenium, vitamin B-12, and complete protein. It does, however, differ significantly in two ways. Albacore is a healthier option that is good for one’s heart and even fights some types of cancer since it is a better supply of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids than other tuna. It has the EPA and DHA kinds of omega-3 fatty acids, which decrease triglycerides, slow the development of atherosclerotic plaques, and guard against arrhythmias.

Which is healthier, chunk light tuna or albacore?

One of our favorite things about canned tuna is that there are so many different kinds available, each with their own unique flavor, texture, and price. Our response below details the main distinctions between the two most popular varieties of canned tuna—white albacore and light—as well as their ideal applications and any nutritional variations.

Only albacore tuna is referred to as white tuna, including chunk white and solid white albacore tuna. Compared to solid or chunk light fish, albacore tuna is a larger fish with lighter-colored flesh, a firmer texture, and a milder flavor. For meals that call for a milder flavor, some consumers choose albacore over light because of this (like this No Stress Salad recipe).

The term “light tuna” refers to a group of smaller tuna species, most frequently skipjack but also maybe yellowfin, tongol, or big-eye. Solid or chunk light tuna works well in casseroles, pasta dishes, and tuna salads because these foods highlight the somewhat stronger flavor. Another benefit is that chunk light tuna is the least priced type of tuna in cans.

The solid vs. chunk designation denotes the size of the tuna chunks in the can. For instance, “solid white albacore” and “chunk white albacore,” which were both referenced before in this article. Chunk tuna comes in smaller bits that vary in size, while solid tuna includes larger, tougher pieces with fewer flakes. But throughout it all, remember that albacore is the only option.

All varieties of canned tuna are nutrient-rich sources of lean protein, omega-3 fatty acids, selenium, and other necessary elements. Albacore tuna has slightly more fat and calories than other types, but the difference is so negligible that you shouldn’t let it stop you.

For various reasons, we prefer solid and chunk tuna, and we frequently utilize both in a range of canned tuna recipes. For instance, we adore the light flavor of the new Bumble Bee(r) Prime Fillet(r) Solid Light Tuna – Tonno in Olive Oil, which is ideal for topping a bed of rice and vegetables, as in this delicious Travel Ready Sesame Ginger Tuna Bowl recipe.

If you’d want to understand more about the distinctions between these prevalent forms of tuna, definitely give our Solid White Albacore Tuna vs. Chunk Light Tuna page a read.

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